Always Welcome


Have any of you watched the Japanese drama TV show called “Midnight Diner”? It’s a Netflix show that a good friend of mine who lives down the street recommended; I just finished watching it with my husband. “Midnight Diner” takes place in Tokyo’s Shinjuku ward, centering on the relationships and happenings surrounding a small diner only open after midnight and until sunrise. This diner is unique in that there is no set menu; rather, guests can order whatever they like, and if the ingredients are available that night, the chef will make it for them. Guests come to the diner and order a dish deeply embedded in their own past and memories. As such, each episode centers around the stories and connections between individuals that become linked through food, cooking, and taste. The premise of the show reminded me of my own philosophy around food and human connection, and watching it each night, I felt particularly blessed to be a part of my own shared small food community and past here in America. If you have the chance, I hope you can watch the show.


The other day, I took apart one of the old “yukata” (a more casual variation of kimono) that my grandmother gave to me many years ago, and with it I sewed a “noren.” “Noren” is a hallmark of Japanese culture and aesthetics: two long pieces of cloth that hang in front of entrances (often placed in door frames and entrances to shops and restaurants, not unlike the one from “Midnight Diner”. The noren acts as a border between two different environments as well as being a more fluid form of a doorway, one that lets in sound and smell and light and shadows. Simultaneously, the noren symbolizes a welcoming. Oftentimes, the placement of a noren at a restaurant entrance indicates that the store is ‘open.’ Although my own home is not a restaurant or a shop, I hang my noren with the hopes of letting those who come to visit know that they are always welcome.

Although the summer heat seems to be continuing, my own thoughts are already starting to turn towards autumn. For September, I will be attempting one of America’s signature desserts: blueberry pie. I will be dialing back a bit on the sweetness, instead complimenting the flavor with fresh organic blueberries and my own fresh pie dough. Pie needs to be eaten more quickly than bread, which can be enjoyed for an entire week, so I recommend giving some to a good friend or sharing with your family.

The other dessert I will be preparing is a tart using the fresh figs grown by my neighbors, Eddie and Sophie. Similar to the other tarts I have sold in the past (peach, orange), this is one of my favorites. I hope you enjoy.

English muffins, bagels, and rye bread will also be available; if you are interested, please reach out to me directly.


I’m looking forward to seeing you all under my new noren!

Masako


『深夜食堂』という日本のドラマを知っていますか?近所の友人の勧めでNetflixで見始めたシリーズ、夫と一緒に楽しみました。東京新宿を舞台にした、ある小さな食堂での人間ドラマ。決まったメニューはほとんどなくお客さんが食べたいものを、材料さえあればなんでも作ってもらえる、というちょっと変わった食堂。食べ物に込められた人々の思いが語られ、同じものを食べながら、食堂の中で知り合いになり感情を共有するお客さん同志。私がいつも考える人と食べ物の関係にすごく近い感じがして、私もアメリカで食を通してみなさんと接せることができることをすごく幸せに感じました。是非機会があればこのドラマみてみてください。


先日、祖母から昔譲り受けた夏の浴衣を解体して、のれんをつくりました。のれんは日本の伝統的ないわゆる仕切りの意味をもつ、上からつらされた2枚布で、よく店先の玄関外にみるものです。そののれんをくぐることが違う空間へ移動することでもあり、日本の建具に象徴される障子と同じように、ドアで完全に仕切るのではなく、光を通したり風を通したり、向こう側の影がみえたりする曖昧さがあります。同時にのれんには、「ようこそ』といったウェルカミングの意味もあり、こののれんがかかるとお店の開店を意味することも多くあります。私の家はお店ではありませんが、大勢の人にいつでもきてもらいたい、という願いを込めて一生懸命手で縫いました。是非次回お越しの際にはみてください。


まだまだ暑さは続きそうですが私の気分は少し秋に傾きつつあります。9月はアメリカの代表デザートでもあるパイにチャレンジしてブルーベリーパイを販売します。甘さ控えめ、オーガニックブルーベリーをたっぷり入れて自分で製粉した生地と一緒に焼き上げます。パイはブレッドのように1週間かけて大事に食べるわけにはいきません。仲の良いお友達や家族といっしょに是非早く食べてください。

もう一つのデザートは近所の友人ソフィーとエディーの庭で大切に育てられた美味しいフィグを使ったタルトです。このタルトは以前販売したことのあるオレンジやピーチのタルトと同じぐらいに私が大好きなタルトです。是非これもお試しください。


イングリッシュマフィンやベーグル、ライブレッドも予定しています。これらについては直接メールでお問い合わせください。


それではのれんの下でお待ちしています。来月お会いしましょう。



45 views1 comment